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The question of mankind’s greatest need is answered in the central message of the Bible
November 5, 2017

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Dear Editor,

Perhaps you missed the historical significance of October 31st. It was that day 500 years ago, in 1517, that the German monk, Martin Luther, posted his 95 Theses on the door of Wittenberg church. These, written in Latin, and meant for the clergy, were issues concerning the beliefs and practices of the Roman Church.

Luther wanted to state publicly that his desire was that these issues be debated. He had come to believe from his study of the scriptures, the Bible, that there were serious discrepancies between what the Bible, God's Word and revelation to men, said, and what the church believed and practiced.

Others took the theses and translated them into German. They had copies printed and distributed, and, like is often stated, "the rest is history."

Along with the leadership of many others, the Reformation changed the world. But men were only the agents; the Word of the living God was the force.

The divine inspiration, authority, and veracity (accuracy and truthfulness) of the scriptures were the issues then, and in 2017 they still are.

Who is God? How should He be worshipped and served?

How did the universe and we ourselves come to be? What is sin and how did it get here, and what are its effects? What is true and what is false in a moral sense?

What is the chief end of man? (What is man's main purpose in life?)

What is death spiritually?

What is death physically? Is there a heaven and is there a hell?

These are only a few of the questions that the Creator answers through the Bible.

But the question of mankind's greatest need is answered in the central message of the Bible.

One catechism says it well: "The central message of the Bible is the redemption of sinners through the person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ for the glory of God."

Brian Squiers

Rural Tama

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